Top Five Titles for Analysis

In yet another week that saw the markets continue to march higher, some of the top Wall Street firms that we cover were continuing to lower the boom with Sell ratings on some of...

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Double Rates in Biotechnology

The biotech market has been on fire this year, and there is every indication that things will go on changing. With huge binary events right around the corner, and many of the top...

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Six Stocks to Buy According to the Piper Jaffray Model Portfolio

Most Wall Street firms run model portfolios for their institutional and retail clients. Like all portfolios, they make weighting changes based on a variety of specifics that can...

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E-commerce Growth and its Impact

The days of big-box retail dominating the market place are over. Brick-and-mortar stores that want to compete have to have everything online that compliments their traditional...

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Ten Things You Need to Know

Following the market crash and ensuing recession in 2008, somebody was going to be named the bad guy. It wasn’t going to be the politicians who insisted that everybody had a...

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Six Industrial Stocks Worth Buying

As the stock market races to new highs, all investors seem to ask the same question. With this much positive momentum, how do I stay involved? Can I commit new capital and not...

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Investing in Data Security

The 2014 RSA Security Conference is in full swing in San Francisco. One thing is for sure, like 2013, the increase in hype around security is apparently very evident, and end...

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Top Five Investing Strategies

24/7 Wall St. has continued to see the endless themes and predictions made by Wall Street firms for 2014. Over the past month, we have highlighted many of the top picks and pans...

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Top Ten Spheres for Investing in Technology

Want to get a head start on what angel and venture capitalists are looking for in 2014? Here are some sectors we hear whispers about from investors: 1. Healthcare IT Healthcare...

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Кто мы

Саутбери Холдинг является инвестиционной группой компаний. Мы можем предложить Вам полный комплекс финансовых продуктов, услуг и инструментов, которые обычно помогают инвесторам управлять своими финансами. Мы предоставляем качественные финансовые услуги для Всех наших клиентов.

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Что мы делаем

Саутбери Холдинг предоставляет торговлю акциями, облигациями, паевыми фондами, биржевыми индексными фондами, долговыми обязательствами и пр. Мы всегда предлагаем лучшие продукты, самые продуктивные инструменты и наиболее удобные финансовые услуги по наиболее низким ценам.

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Что мы предлагаем

Онлайн акции, фьючерсы, облигации, более 11 000 паевых фондов, биржевые индексные фонды, долговые обязательства, казначейские сертификаты, ценные бумаги фиксированного дохода и депозитные вклады. Для открытия счета не нужен минимальный депозит, плата за обслуживание или простаивание не взимается.

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Michael Steinhardt

Michael Steinhardt

he told of the six things that investors need to stay grounded:

- Make all of your mistakes early in life. The more tough lessons early on, the fewer errors you make later.
- Always make your living doing something you enjoy.
- Be intellectually competitive. The key to research is to assimilate as much data as possible in order to be to the first to sense a major change.
- Make good decisions even with incomplete information. You will never have all the information you need. What matters is what you do with the information you have.
- Always trust your intuition, which resembles a hidden supercomputer in the mind. It can help you do the right thing at the right time if you give it a chance.
- Don’t make small investments. If you’re going to put money at risk, make sure the reward is high enough to justify the time and effort you put into the investment decision.

Philip Fisher

Philip Fisher

Let’s Focus on investing for the long term.  When you are looking for next investing object, you can use next recommended tools. Special check list of characteristics to look for in a common stock and focus on two categories: management’s characteristics and the characteristics of the business. Important qualities for management included:

1) integrity,

2) conservative accounting,

3) accessibility and good long-term outlook,

4) openness to change,

5) excellent financial controls, and

6) good personnel policies.

Important business characteristics would include a growth orientation, high profit margins, high return on capital, a commitment to research and development, superior sales organization, leading industry position and proprietary products or services.

Benjamin Graham

Benjamin Graham

Benjamin Graham is most widely know for being a teacher and mentor to Warren Buffett. It is important to note, however, that he attained this role because of his work “father of value investing”. He made a lot of money for himself and his clients without taking huge risks in the stock market. He was able to do this because he solely used financial analysis to successfully invest in stocks. He was also instrumental in many elements of the Securities Act of 1933, which required public companies to disclose independently audited financial statements. Graham also stressed having a margin of safety in one’s investments – which meant buying well below a conservative valuation of a business.

John Templeton

John Templeton

John Templeton is the creator of the modern mutual fund. He came to this idea by his own experience: in 1939, he bought 100 shares of every company trading on the NYSE below $1. He bought 104 companies in total, for a total investment of $10,400. During the next four years, 34 of these companies went bankrupt, but he was able to sell the entire remaining portfolio for $40,000. This gave him the realization of diversification and investing the market as a whole – some companies will fail while others will gain. John Templeton was described as the ultimate bargain hunter. He would also search out companies globally when nobody else was doing so. He believed that the best value stocks were those that were completely neglected. He also managed all of this from the Bahamas, which kept him away from Wall Street.

Bill Gross

Bill Gross

Bill Gross is considered by many the “king of bonds”. He is the founder and leading manager for PIMCO, and he and his team have over $600 billion under management in fixed-income investments. While Bill’s main focus is buying individual bonds, he has an investment style that focuses on the total portfolio. He believes that successful investment in the long-run rests on two foundations: the ability to formulate and articulate a long-term outlook and having the correct structural composition within ones portfolio over time to take advantage of this outlook. He goes on to say that long-term should be about 3-5 years, and by thinking this far out, it prevents investors from getting emotional whiplash of the day-to-day markets.

Carl Icahn

Carl Icahn

Carl Icahn is known throughout the investing world as either a ruthless corporate raider or a leader in shareholder activism. Your view, I guess, depends on your position within the company he is going after. Icahn is a value investor that seeks out companies that he believes are poorly managed. He tries to get on the Board of Directors by acquiring enough shares to vote himself in, and then changes senior management to something he believes is more favorable to deliver solid results. He has had a lot of success with this over the past 30 years. While not true value investing, hr does focus on companies that are undervalued. He just looks for ones that are undervalued due to mismanagement – something he believes is pretty easy to change once you are in charge.

 

George Soros

George Soros

George Soros is most commonly known as the man who “broke the Bank of England”. In September 1992, he risked $10 billion on a single trade when he shorted the British Pound. He was right, and in a single day made over $1 billion. It is estimated that the total trade netted almost $2 billion. He is also famous for running his Quantum Fund, which generated an average annual return of more than 30% while he was the lead manager.

Soros focuses on identifying broad macro-economic trends into highly leveraged plays in bonds and commodities. Soros is the odd-man out in the Top 10 Greatest Investors, has he doesn’t have a clearly defined strategy, more of a speculative strategy that came from his gut.

He said: «Nobody who has read a business magazine in the last few years can be unaware that these days there really are investors who not only move money in anticipation of a currency crisis, but actually do their best to trigger that crisis for fun and profit. These new actors on the scene do not yet have a standard name; my proposed term is ‘Soroi’.

John Bogle

John Bogle

Jack Bogle is the founder of The Vanguard Group, which most people associate with low cost mutual funds. However, that is not how he stated. He graduated from Princeton University and went to work at Wellington Management Company, where he quickly rose through the ranks to Chairman. Although he was fired for a bad merger, he learned a huge lesson and went on to found The Vanguard Group.

With his new company and a new idea for index mutual funds, Bogle would grow The Vanguard Group into the second largest mutual fund company. Bogle likes to keep his investing style extremely simple, and has highlighted eight basic rules for investors:

- Select low cost funds
- Consider carefully the added cost of advice
- Do not overrate past fund performance
- Use past performance only to determine consistency and risk
- Beware of star managers
- Beware of asset size
- Don’t own too many funds
- Buy your fund portfolio and hold it!

Warren Edward Buffett

Warren Edward Buffett

Warren Buffett is widely regarded as the most successful investor in the world based on the amount of capital he started with and what he was able to grow it into. Prior to his partnerships, Buffett held various investment jobs, with his last earning him $12,000 per year. When he stated his partnerships, he had a personal savings of around $174,000. Today, he has turned that initial amount into around $50 billion!

He said: «My luck was accentuated by my living in a market system that sometimes produces distorted results, though overall it serves our country well… I’ve worked in an economy that rewards someone who saves the lives of others on a battlefield with a medal, rewards a great teacher with thank-you notes from parents, but rewards those who can detect the mispricing of securities with sums reaching into the billions.»

Peter Lynch

Peter Lynch

Peter Lynch is best known for managing the Fidelity Magellan Fund for over 13 years, during which time his assets under management grew from $20 million to over $14 billion. More importantly, Lynch beat the S&P500 Index in 11 of those 13 years with an average annual return of 29%. Lynch consistently applied a set of eight fundamentals to his selection process:

- Know what you know
- It’s futile to predict the economy and interest rates
- You have plenty of time to identify and recognize exceptional companies
- Avoid long shots
- Good management is very important – buy good businesses
- Be flexible and humble, and learn from mistakes
- Before you make a purchase, you should be able to explain why you are buying
- There’s always something to worry about – do you know what it is?